Sequoia Treemaps

Have you ever pondered what files you have on your hard drive that are filling your drive up and yet you just can’t seem to place your finger on them. You’re not sure if they’re log files for something or if you’ve just not realized how much money you’ve been spending on iTunes perhaps.

Look no further than Sequoia Treemaps. Different than what you’re probably accustomed to, but actually quite nice to help you visually see just what’s clogging your system.

Now if you’re looking for something a little more granular because hey you’re more of a numbers kind of person, then maybe you should check this out:

Folder Size for Windows Explorer

Pretty snazzy Windows Explorer plugin that allows you to see just how clogged some of your directory structures are.

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Zapping your hard drive quick and easy… at only 125 pounds…

Dark Reading – Host security – Researchers Find Technique to Quickly Erase Hard Drives – Security

If you’ve ever been worried about someone snooping your data perhaps after you turn your work laptop into your employer when you leave, you might want to consider using something like Jetico’s BCWipe. It’s a program that essentially writes 1’s and 0’s all over your harddisk, making the data unretrievable without some super pricey equipment. Additionally it usually can take up to a day to wipe say a 100 GB harddrive (yes, even a 7200 rpm drive will take a while).
So sure, that’s fine if you’ve got a couple of days to plan things and you need to make sure that your drive is wiped before you leave, but what about those instances where you just need to wipe something immediately? Well, it would seem that the US Government is investigating doing something about this. Many times there is a need for the immediate disposal of media, and using something like the aforementioned software just doesn’t cut it. Enter the media disposal system reference in the aforementioned article. Holy smokes that’s sweet. But my curiousity is why not just use a good ole fashioned microwave? I mean, when I was in college, I used a microwave to destroy CDs from time to time and they were more or less unreadable. However, by no means do I suggest this, as it is hazardous to both your health and a fire safety issue.The only caveat to the story is that the device weighs a whopping 125 pounds. Granted it mentions that they’re working on putting together something that is a little more transportable, but for the time being it would seem that’s a little out of the question.

Comcast catching up with Verizon…

Comcast rolls out Motorola SBV5220 cable modem with battery backup – Engadget

So I have to say that I’m mildly amused by the fact that Comcast finally realized that they needed to provide a battery backup of some sort for the media delivery system. Notice, I’m not calling this a cable modem even though Engagdet seems to call it that. Considering that all forms of media – internet, television and telephony – are delivered through their “cable modem” I find it interesting that they’re including their “modem” with battery backup. Probably the most critical reason to do this is obviously so that if the power goes out and there’s an emergency you’re able to dial the proper authorities. Verizon of course put this in from the get go, making it external the modem itself.

So yeah, Comcast, you’re behind still oh and your speed isn’t too peppy…